“There’s this big house, that is me, and these different rooms, that are different genres, and each time a door opens, it could be Funk, Rap, Reggae, Screaming, it really depends on how I’m feeling at the time, and what a track calls for”

If there is anyone who enjoys discovering brand new music, it goes 100% without saying, that it is unequivocally me (obviously). Having an ear for good, quality music and an eye that can easily recognize a musical flame before it becomes an all-out blazing inferno is literally what I live for! As such, if you have NOT yet heard of Harry Edohoukwa, then prepare for your whole life to be forever changed! Harry Edohoukwa, whose musical style is comprised of both reggae and hip-hop melodies, is a McKinney native, whose future has nowhere to go, but up! I had the pleasure of seeing Edohoukwa perform at Deep Ellum Art Co., where he opened for hip-hop artist, Duckwrth. Before he even spoke a single word into the microphone, there was an unmistakable electric in the air that let you know that this young artist had a lot to say; and a lot he said, indeed!

Dressed in a satin white shirt, and black leather pants, Edohoukwa, unleashed a mouthful of lyrics literally bursting with emotion. I don’t mean lyrics where you have to infer or assume what the artist meant, I mean actual emotion that translated so smoothly, that it evoked the same emotion in the listeners! Whether it was the disbelief in the lyrics, “If you love me like you say you do,” or the fiery rage from “Rick Flair’s“, “If you want to bitch, then bitch about it,” the crowd parroted every word back with just as much force. Don’t even get me started on the women in the crowd. The way they screamed and extended their arms to reach out in attempts to touch Edohoukwa was almost reminiscent to the concerts of Michael Jackson, himself. With such a huge comparison and bigger shoes to fill, I had to know more about this talented musician. After sitting down with Edohoukwa, I learned that, like most artists, he knew that music was his calling from a very young age.

I compared the way that the women were screaming for you to the likeness of Michael Jackson. Those are pretty BIG shoes to fill. Let me ask you this, when did you realize that this was the life for you?

“I think I’ve always known that [music is what I wanted to do]. I always freestyled in 5th grade and recorded for the first time in 6th grade. I kind of left it alone, after that, but got back into it during my sophomore year of high school.”

 

So, what genre, exactly, would you call the music that you make?

“If you could help me with that, that would be awesome. I don’t know if it’s rapping, or singing, or screaming. Its rap, reggae, funk, rock. I wouldn’t know how to put it in words really. There’s this big house, that is me, and these different rooms, that are different genres, and each time a door opens, it could be Funk, Rap, Reggae, Screaming, it really depends on how I’m feeling at the time, and what a track calls for. It’s really hard to label!”

 

So, for starters, I have to know, Team Apple or Team Android?

“iPhone! Only because I have an iPhone. I used to be team Blackberry. Actually, fuck Apple and Android. I like the Blackberry.  I love the keyboard. I always look at owners of Blackberries as people who know shit, and get shit done. [If you’re a Blackberry owner] You don’t need apps, because you’re all about your business. I’m an artist through and through, but I love the business side, plus I don’t like the weight of Androids.”

 

Often times, I have found that the artists that play nonstop on a person’s phone can tell more about them than actual words. Who do you consider worthy enough to loop through your headphones on the daily?

“I listen to a lot of reggae. There’s Bob Marley, Beres Hammond, whose Music is Life album is amazing, Lucky Dube, who, out of everyone I list is probably my favorite. If you’re going to listen to Dube, “Trinity”, “Monster”, “It’s Not Easy,” and “Prisoner” would be good songs to listen to, Fleetwood Mack, Abba, that’s some old school music, Gunna, and Ama Lou.”

 

If you had to name a few people, who would you list as your musical inspirations?

“That’s easy. Lucky Dube, Beres Hammond, Bob Marley, James Brown, Jim Morrison [of the Doors], Paul Simon, Chance the Rapper, Jay Z, Kanye West, Bob Dylan, who inspired me to start taking storytelling and song writing to another level, and Kid Cudi, who was the biggest inspiration, that made me resent labels and conventional rapping.”

 

What are your thoughts about record deals, and the idea that you absolutely have to sign to a label to be successful?

“If I was signed, they’d be expecting this out of me, and that out of me, and that’s not what I want. I know you have to do what you have to do to start doing what you want to do, but I’d choose 100% no record label. They’d have to come up with a crazy offer, which they wouldn’t do, because no one really offers you what you deserve. It wouldn’t be a good business practice. Praise god there are examples like Chance the Rapper! I remember, this girl asked me [in college] ‘Do you ever feel bad that you are the same age as Chance, and that he’s doing music and we’re studying for test?’ But I’m not mad, and I probably would’ve gone down the whole record label route [if it weren’t for him], but seeing him do it the way he’s done it, just seeing this shows me that it is possible [without a record label]. Signing a deal doesn’t sound liberating. I’d rather build a team.”

 

The last question I have for you is: Who do you make music for?

I’m making music for the people. That’s all it’s about; connecting to people. I want people to be like, ‘Hey man I was really tripping, and listening to “Joy”, and it really helped me through.’ I’m here to be a vessel, so whatever God wants to me to say, I’m here to say it, and I don’t want to be limited to any genre, limited to any race, limited to any country, or anything. I’m really shooting for the top of the top.”

 

Currently, Harry Edohoukwa has released three hit singles, “Ric Flair”, “Joy”, and “Mrs. Mrs.”, while also releasing his debut EP, Silhouettes (Circa ’17) in April of this year. Now, if you have been totally convinced, and are interested in joining the “Harry Edohoukwa” wave, I’d suggest you jump on board before it inevitably turns into a massive tsunami!

Apple Music | Spotify

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